Author Topic: Cruelty conviction quashed in shocking case, Tasmania is animal abuse central  (Read 1068 times)

Export News Tasmania

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Meanwhile, this appalling abuser, like all the others in Tasmania, is free to get another animsl and do it all again; that is the clear and consistent message from these cases in Tasmania. It indicates the poor talent pool from which Tasmanian magistrates are selected, and makes a clear case for them to be on performance-based salaries measured by community expectations. Otherwise there will never be any change. Perhaps magistrates who are 'elderly' and 'may have cancer' (what evidence did she have of this?) should be treated the same way as this poor, suffering dog was.

Export News Tasmania

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Dog cruelty case shock

SALLY GLAETZER   |   January 12, 2012

ANIMAL lovers are "disgusted and heartbroken" by a magistrate's decision to overturn a cruelty conviction against a man accused of starving his dog to death.

[attach=#1] DISTRESS: Ailing Wags was too weak to stand.


Last year, Carlton man Peter Alexander Thomas, 50, was found guilty of causing the death of his border collie, Wags, who was found severely emaciated in 2009.

When RSPCA inspectors found Wags after a tip-off, the dog's spine, ribs and pelvis were protruding, he was dehydrated, his eyes were sunken and oozing and his kidneys were failing.

He was was unable to bear his own weight and was put down by a vet.

Mr Thomas's conviction has now been set aside, with Magistrate Cath Rheinberger finding Wags was elderly and sick, possibly with cancer and even veterinary care would not have saved him.

Dogs' Homes of Tasmania president John Gray said he was still trying to come to terms with the decision to dismiss the charge.

"We are disgusted," Mr Gray said last night.

"I'm still trying to come to grips with it. I'm heartbroken.

"Regardless of whether the dog had cancer, the dog would not get to that scale [of suffering] overnight, Wags must've been suffering for a long, long time."

The RSPCA had appealed against what it called the inadequacy of the original $432 fine handed to Mr Thomas before he had his conviction quashed.

Chief executive Ben Sturges said the court decision was disappointing, particularly given the apparent lack of vet care sought for Wags by Mr Thomas.

"You wouldn't let your child get to that state would you?" he said.

Mr Gray said he believed the Tasmanian public would be dismayed by this week's court decision.

"You can just imagine what the little fella was going through can't you?" he said.

Meanwhile, a review of Tasmania's animal welfare legislation is under way.

http://www.themercury.com.au/article/2012/01/12/291751_tasmania-news.html
« Last Edit: January 12, 2012, 11:38:12 PM by WA Export News »