Author Topic: Live exporters blamed for shark attacks 7.12.2010  (Read 989 times)

WA Export News

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Re: Live exporters blamed for shark attacks 7.12.2010
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2012, 01:42:21 PM »
We understand the Bader III was in close proximity to the area at the time of the attacks.

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Live exporters blamed for shark attacks 7.12.2010
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2012, 01:29:54 PM »
 Live exporters blamed for shark attacks By Caitlyn Gribbin from Mount Isa 4825
 Tuesday, 07/12/2010

 A man holds open the mouth of a shark believed to be behind an attack on tourists height=255 A man holds open the mouth of a shark believed to be behind an attack on tourists in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, December 2, 2010.  (Egyptian Ministry of the Environment)


Australian live cattle and sheep exporters say there's no way deadly shark attacks can be linked to their trade.

 In Egypt, an unusually high number of recent shark attacks has led to claims Australian live exporters could be to blame.

 Sharks are extremely rare in Sharm El-Sheikh, the popular Egyptian holiday destination, but authorities at the Red Sea Resort were forced to shut the beach this week after a German tourist was killed on Sunday.

 Four other divers were also injured in shark attacks last week.

 The unusual increase in sharks has led to much speculating about the reasons, and the finger's being pointed at Australian live exporters.

 Locals say they've seen sheep carcasses being thrown overboard from Australian ships.

 Hisham Gabr Ali is the chairman of Egypt's Chamber of Diving and Water Sports. He's worried the dumping of carcasses near the resort could be attracting sharks.

 "I know for a fact that sheep have been thrown into the water by a boat," he said.

 But live cattle exporting leader and Northern Territory Livestock Exporters Association deputy chairman Sid Parker refuses to accept his industry is to blame.

 Mr Parker says strict protocols are in place to ensure carcasses are disposed of safely.

 "From where it was it couldn't have been an Australian ship because there hasn't been any go to Egypt in the past few weeks," Mr Parker says.

 "I say it's all rot."

 In a written statement, LiveCorp says Australia is one of many countries that ships livestock through the Red Sea and that Australia uses the best livestock vessels of any of these countries.

 It says Australia far exceeds international shipping standards -and has the world's highest animal welfare standards for sheep onboard vessels.

 But RSPCA Australia's chief executive Heather Neil says the reports from Egypt are proof the live export trade should cease.

 "I think what it really points out from a live exporting and a RSPCA perspective is that 35,000 sheep are dying on the journey from Australia to the Middle East and those bodies need to be disposed of," Ms Neil says.

 "Sometimes they're just thrown overboard but sometimes those bodies are minced and then the meat is thrown overboard."


http://www.abc.net.au/rural/content/2010/s3086796.htm