Author Topic: Hundreds of infected sheep already sold  (Read 702 times)

Export News Tasmania

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Re: Hundreds of infected sheep already sold
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2012, 11:40:57 PM »
So we can expect a bloodbath with knives and machetes?

Export News Tasmania

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Hundreds of infected sheep already sold
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2012, 11:38:43 PM »
Several hundred infected sheep, brought from Australia and kept at a cattle farm near Razzaqabad, were shifted to many unknown hotels and restaurants prior to official orders from the Commissioner Karachi to cull them, The News has learnt.
 
Several trucks and pick-ups carrying the ailing animals were seen travelling to  roadside hotels and restaurants on both the National and Super highways, witnesses said.
 

Residents of Razzaqabad town claimed to have witnessed several hundred sheep, loaded on trucks and pick-ups, being transported away from the cattle farm. They feared that these animals, infected with viral and bacterial diseases, were sold to roadside restaurants at throwaway prices.
 
This scribe also witnessed several sheep being transported on the Super Highway in small and medium-sized trucks. The drivers of the vehicles refused to disclose the destination of their load, but admitted that these were the same sheep that were brought from Australia.
 
Authorities in Karachi, including the Sindh Livestock Department and Commissioner Karachi, ordered the culling of the infected sheep on Sunday and the burying of their bodies in large trenches.
 
However, witnesses said that several hundred sheep had already been shifted and sold to hotels restaurant-owners and butchers prior to the orders of the commissioner.
 
Experts warned that the infected meat could not only cause health issues to consumers, but could also result in transmitting diseases among other humans.
 
 Culling continues
 
The 22,000 Australian sheep infected with scabby mouth will be slaughtered and buried in three of four days, the city’s commissioner said on Monday.
 
“There is a large number of sheep and it will take time to dispose of them,” Roshan Ali Sheikh told The News.However, it appears that the process will more time than that as only about 500 infected sheep were slaughtered on Sunday night, and the authorities concerned were waiting for butchers till 2pm on Monday.
 
The commissioner had earlier announced that the sheep would be administered lethal injections, but the decision was later changed. A senior medical expert requesting anonymity said the infected sheep should be buried “deep down” and away from human population, just like hospital waste was buried. EDO Health Karachi Dr Nasir Javed told The News that there was no danger of the carcasses contaminating underground water.
 
Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf has also taken notice of the import of the infected sheep.The sheep were accepted by Pakistan after they were rejected by Bahrain following the detection of their disease.
 
An Australian newspaper has quoted the spokesperson for the export company Wellards as confirming that a vessel, Ocean Drover, had originally left Australia with 75,000 sheep a month ago and off-loaded 53,000 at two other ports before Bahrain officials claimed some animals were infected with orf or scabby mouth disease.
 
In 2003, thousands of sheep died on the Cormo Express, after Saudi Arabia refused entry on the disputed claim there were high levels of disease. That ship was stuck at sea for 80 days. The spokesperson for Wellards did not identify the new destination for the sheep due to “commercial confidentiality” but the newspaper, The Australian, believed they were off-loaded in Pakistan.
 
The spokesman said the mortality rate on-board the vessel remained below the government upper limit and they were cared for by a federal government-accredited vet. But Animals Australia campaign director Lyn White said the incident showed that Australia’s live export regulations were not working.

Shahid Husain
Karachi   http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-4-132479-Hundreds-of-infected-sheep-already-sold
« Last Edit: September 20, 2012, 10:27:26 AM by WA Export News »