Author Topic: Live exports to Indonesia dry up 2.10.2012  (Read 773 times)

Export News Tasmania

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Re: Live exports to Indonesia dry up
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2012, 10:18:26 PM »
Where is the shade for these animals as required by the ASEL?

Export News Tasmania

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Live exports to Indonesia dry up 2.10.2012
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2012, 10:17:50 PM »
Import permits for cattle being sold to Indonesia are set to run out by the end of this month, meaning no more Australian feeder cattle will be exported in November and December of this year.

      Port of Karumba height=394 Cattle in holding yards at the Port of Karumba.  (Virginia Tapp)
 

 
Indonesia cut back the amount of cattle it would take from Australia for 2012, issuing only 283,000 permits, about half the amount issued the year before.

Livestock agent David Cundy, says time is running out for producers trying to sell cattle to Indonesia.

"Everyone's got different circumstances and different situations, but quite potentially there could be cattle that should go on a boat (to Indonesia) that don't go this year," he says.

"The price is softening and I have heard of cattle being contracted at $1.85 a kilo (steers) and that probably tells you there are a few more cattle then anticipated permits."

Mr Cundy says the industry continues to remain hopeful that Indonesia will issue more permits, but it's looking extremely unlikely.

"We always hold hope and would like to think so (get more permits), but on current form you would suggest probably not and we're not really expecting any more this year and I think we'll have to wait for the allocation for January-March."

In November and December last year, Australia exported over 80,000 head of cattle to Indonesia.

Live export contracts were a hot topic on the first day of sales at Brahman Week in Gracemere yesterday.

The sale draws a crowd from all over Australia.

Many were worried about the lack of interest they were getting from northern producers, a reflection of the tough times they are experiencing.

Agent from Longreach, Bill Seeney says it's hard to tell how many Northern Territory cattle might be flowing into eastern markets.

He says quite a few came through from the north 18 months ago but things have quietened down lately.

Mr Seeney says prices for fat cattle is very dismal at the moment and any extra cattle would only put more pressure on a tough market.

By Amy Phillips Tuesday, 2 October  2012

 http://www.abc.net.au/rural/qld/content/2012/10/s3601878.htm?site=westqld
 
« Last Edit: October 02, 2012, 10:27:51 PM by WA Export News »