Author Topic: RSPCA attacks proposed animal welfare standards 25.10.2012  (Read 781 times)

Export News Tasmania

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Re: RSPCA attacks proposed animal welfare standards 25.10.2012
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2012, 05:29:49 PM »
And what about the RSPCA's OWN relationships with farming industries from which it gets royalties? As for the opportuity for animal 'welfare/rights' having the opportunity to make comment, when has any notice ever been taken of them?

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Re: RSPCA attacks proposed animal welfare standards 25.10.2012
« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2012, 09:47:19 AM »
AHA or Animal Health Australia is a company founded to support and promote agriculture.

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RSPCA attacks proposed animal welfare standards 25.10.2012
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2012, 09:43:12 AM »
RSPCA attacks proposed animal welfare standards By Sarina Locke
 Thursday, 25/10/2012
 

An RSPCA legal officer is scathing of the new animal welfare regulations being drawn up for the local livestock industries.

The new standards and guidelines for the cattle and sheep industries are open for public comment and are expected to be ready by April next year, with standards for pigs and poultry to come later.

The RSPCA's Jed Goodfellow objects to the close relationship between governments and industries.

He says a healthy animal in an intensive operation might not have its psychological needs met.

Mr Goodfellow says the RSPCA and Animals Australia should have been involved from the outset.

"There needs to be greater equality in the democratic participation opportunities afforded to both industries and to animal welfare, so we get a more dialogue in the deal-making stages of developing our farm animal welfare laws."

But the body responsible for drawing together the new animal welfare regulations dismisses the criticism.

Dr Mike Bond, from Animal Health Australia, says animal rights and welfare interest groups will get their say in due course.

"We've got to remember what the objective of all of this is, and that is to improve animal welfare, and to do that we've got to change people's behaviour," he said.

"It's important that the livestock industries have ownership of these standards and guidelines."


http://www.abc.net.au/rural/news/content/201210/s3618357.htm
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 09:46:32 AM by WA Export News »