Recent Posts

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
91
Dogs in bunker case highlights the problem of puppy farms 

720 ABC Perth  By Emma Wynne   Posted Fri 6 Jun 2014, 2:10pm AEST

    Puppy farm closed height=227 Photo: A dog is lifted out of an underground bunker at a puppy farm in the Wheatbelt. (Supplied: RSPCA)
 
A recent animal cruelty case in WA has reignited discussion around the ethics of breeding puppies for profit.

Katherine Lisa King was found guilty on May 5 of three counts of animal cruelty.

RSPCA inspectors, police and rangers searched King's property in Kellerberrin and found 50 dogs, 12 of which were being kept in an underground bunker, accessed through a small hole covered by a metal lid.

Tim Mayne from the RSPCA said "the most shocking thing was the underground bunker".

"We were pretty horrified when we lifted the lid and saw the puppies there."

Mr Mayne said the RSPCA has long been campaigning against 'puppy farming', the intensive breeding of dogs for sale, often at lower prices than usual.

"There are legitimate breeders out there," he said.

"Talk to the breeder, see if they are happy for you to inspect their facilities and see the mum and dad of the puppies."

It's a call echoed by Pam Campbell, the Vice-President of the Canine Association of WA.

"We certainly discourage our members from supplying to pet shops. Pet shops do encourage, to an extent, impulse buying," Ms Campbell said, adding that buyers have no way of knowing where the dogs have come from and in what state they were cared for.

"I think the message that the Canine Association would want to send is that anyone who is looking to buy a puppy should do their research first.

"Look for a properly qualified, registered breeder and then go to their premises, see the puppies and the parents and the way the dogs are kept."<blockquote>These puppy farms exist because people want everything cheap, even dogs. If you can't afford the vet, you can't afford the pet.

Fran - SMS to 720 ABC Perth  Talkback caller Claire recounted a distressing experience buying a dog from a registered breeder.

"We decided to go to a breeder and see if we could purchase a companion dog for our collie. We saw an ad for a four-year-old collie and we decided to go to the breeder and purchase the dog.

"Within 24 hours of coming home she was dropping dead puppies. We took her to the vet and he was quite angry.

"The memory of it has stayed with me and have been nervous about breeders ever since. I thought we were doing the right thing by getting a dog from a breeder."

Pam Campbell said the association holds its member to high standards.

"We have a very strict code of conduct for our members and our members are penalised if they do not follow it," she said.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-06/kellerberrin-case-highlights-puppy-farm-problem/5505670?WT.ac=localnews_perth
92
Other (non-export) News / WA oppn calls for puppy breeder register
« Last post by WA Export News on June 06, 2014, 05:34:13 PM »
WA oppn calls for puppy breeder register         
  • June 06, 2014 3:43PM
   
WEST Australian Opposition Leader Mark McGowan is calling for the immediate introduction of a puppy breeder register to drive out dodgy dog dealers.


His comments come after Katherine Lisa King, 43, was found guilty of three animal cruelty charges on Thursday for keeping a dozen dogs in an underground bunker at her South Doodlakine property.

RSPCA inspectors discovered a further 38 dogs on her property, with many suffering from ear mite and secondary infections due to untreated conditions.

King was fined $11,000 by the Perth Magistrates Court and banned for five years from being within 10 metres of an animal.

Mr McGowan said WA had only voluntary registration for dog ownership.

"The most important thing we have to remember is let's stop it happening in the future with a proper registration system backed up by enforcement for puppy breeders to make sure the good
ones are in the business and the bad ones are kicked out the back door," he said.

"That is the only way we'll drive the mistreatment of our dogs out of the system."

Mr McGowan said people buying a puppy from a breeder should demand to see the pup's parents and look at the circumstances in which it was brought up.

And breeders should be required to prove their accreditation when advertising and selling puppies, he said.

"I think West Australians are shocked when they see what can happen and what is going on across this state," he said.

"If people are aware of mistreatment of animals, they should report it to the RSPCA."

In 1999, Mr McGowan introduced the state's second-largest petition to parliament, seeking to strengthen animal welfare laws, with about 66,000 signatures.

The legislation was passed through parliament in 2002.


http://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/wa-oppn-calls-for-puppy-breeder-register/story-e6frfku9-1226945953505
93
Businessman fined $10k for animal cruelty     

CATE BROUGHTON   Last updated 13:31 06/06/2014



 Dave ClemenceFINED: Dave Clemence pleaded guilty to charges relating to the ill-treatment of over 112 sheep.  (Dean Kozanic/Fairfax NZ)


A Kaiapoi businessman has been convicted and fined $10,000 for animal cruelty, after SPCA officers were forced to euthanase 77 of his sheep.

Dave Clemence, who owns Clemence Drilling, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to charges relating to the ill-treatment of over 77 sheep.

It is the second conviction in 10 months for Clemence, who was found guilty of kidnapping two thieves caught on his property in 2011 and fined $3000 in August last year. 

This week he was convicted and fined $10,000, ordered to pay $2040 in veterinary costs, $1000 in solicitors' costs and $130 in court costs for the animal cruelty charges.

Charges were laid by SPCA Canterbury in August last year after inspectors, tipped off by a member of the public, found a number of dead and underweight sheep on his property.

The animals had very little pasture available and supplementary feed provided lacked nutritional value.
 
Barry Helem, chief executive officer for SPCA Canterbury, said his officers were forced to shoot 77 sheep after veterinary assessments determined their condition was too poor for them to be recovered. 
 
''For them to continue on they would be enduring pain and suffering, so the humane thing was to euthanase.''
 
He did not know how long the animals had been in that condition. 
 
SPCA Canterbury inspector Clare Ripper said the case had been harrowing for her and her staff. 
 
''Although our aim is to prevent animal cruelty and suffering, the euthanasia of sick and starving animals is extremely distressing for our team, especially when we know their deaths could have been prevented if owners had acted responsibly.'' 
 
Helem said the case highlighted the problems that can occur when people are farming part-time. 
 
''All too often we deal with owners who do not understand the responsibilities involved. The two most common problems are failure to provide adequate nutritious feed and failure to seek vet treatment as soon as issues arise.''
 
Clemence declined to comment.



http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/10127562/Businessman-fined-10k-for-animal-cruelty
94
Kaiapoi businessman fined for animal cruelty
   
     By: Emily Murphy, New Zealand News | Friday June 6 2014 15:46

       Photo: Stock Xchng   Photo: Stock Xchng   

A Kaiapoi businessman has been fined ten-thousand dollars for animal cruelty, after SPCA officers were forced to euthanase 77 of his sheep.

David Clemence pleaded guilty on Tuesday to several charges under the animal welfare act, after failing to provide the sheep with the basic necessities of life.
 
SPCA CEO Barry Helem says when inspectors found the sheep, they weren't in a good way.
 
He says a number of sheep were already dead, and many were significantly underweight.
 
Clemence was also ordered to pay $130 in court costs.



http://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/auckland/news/nbnat/239305359-kaiapoi-businessman-fined-for-animal-cruelty

95
Cruel WA puppy farmer kept dogs in 'underground bunker' 

Date June 5, 2014 - 5:46PM     
 
 Reporter, WA Today
  The opening to the underground bunker which housed about 12 dogs. The opening to the underground bunker which housed about 12 dogs. Photo: RSPCA
 
A puppy farmer who kept dogs in an underground bunker has been fined and banned from going within 10 metres of any animal.

Katherine Lisa King, from South Doodlakine was found guilty on three counts of animal cruelty in Perth Magistrates Court on Thursday and fined $11,000.

On January 24, 2012, RSPCA inspectors, police and council rangers executed a search warrant on her property.

  A dog is pulled from the underground bunker. A dog is pulled from the underground bunker. Photo: RSPCA

  Fifty dogs that were being kept on the property were seized and taken to the RSPCA, 12 of them were found in an underground bunker.

The floor of the bunker was three metres below ground and could only be accessed through a small circular hole with a metal lid, about one metre in diameter.

RSPCA inspectors said when the lid was opened there was a “stench of animal faeces and urine”. While there was food and water, the dogs were confined to total darkness during the day with little or no ventilation.

All of the dogs found at the property, were roughly segregated according to breed in different areas of the property.

The breeds included German shepherds, west highland terriers, King Charles cavalier spaniels, labradors, and Tibetan terriers among other breeds.

Many of the dogs were found to be suffering from ear mite and secondary infections resulting from failure to treat the conditions by taking the animals to a vet.

In his sentencing, Magistrate Stephen Wilson said “the dogs had been placed in an alien and terrible environment and should never have been placed in the underground bunker”.

“There was no sunlight, no fresh air or flow of air and there was a stench emanating from the when her current banning order expires from bunker,” he said.

RSPCA chief inspector Amanda Swift said this was the first time the RSPCA had discovered a puppy farm of this nature in Western Australia.

“We were shocked to find dogs living in an underground bunker,” she said.

“We are very pleased with today’s court result as it was a collaborative effort between RSPCA, Police and council rangers.”

King was found guilty of being the person in charge of a number of dogs and being cruel to those animals contrary to the Animal Welfare Act.

She was also found guilty of being cruel to approximately 12 dogs by ill-treating them by keeping them confined in an underground.

She was also ordered to pay $20,000 in costs.

When the search warrant was executed in 2012, RSPCA officers also found a miniature pony stallion and six or more chickens on her property despite a ban that was in place prohibiting her from keeping or having contact with animals for 10 years from August 2004.

King’s prohibition order will begin on August 4th when her current banning order expires from her previous conviction.

Chief Executive Officer David van Ooran urged people to be responsible and make informed choices when purchasing a new pet.

“We have produced a useful guide for the public called the Smart Puppy and Dog Buyer’s Guide which provides information on how to best go about finding your new pet,” he said.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/wa-news/cruel-wa-puppy-farmer-kept-dogs-in-underground-bunker-20140605-zrz23.html

96
Cruelty woman back in court

Monday, 28 May 2012 10:42               

A woman will appear in Northam Magistrates Court on Monday for sentencing after being charged by the RSPCA with animal cruelty related charges. At her last appearance in court, Katherine Lisa King was granted an adjournment so she could seek legal advice. A co-accused, Mariana Kathleen Smith, did not appear and a bench warrant was issued for her arrest.

Katherine Lisa King, 41, of South Doodlakine has been found guilty of breaching sections 19 (1) and 19 (2a) and 19 (3h) and also Sections 55 (1), 55 (2) and (4) of the Animal Welfare Act 2002. The two charges relate to cruelty and breaching a court imposed banning order.

Mariana Kathleen Smith, 59, of Chittering, has been charged with breaching sections 19 (1), 19 (2) (a) and 19 (3) (h) of the Animal Welfare Act 2002, namely that she was cruel to animals and allowed them to suffer harm which could have been alleviated by the taking of reasonable steps.

On 24 January 2012, RSPCA Inspectors assisted Police and council Rangers with the execution of a search warrant on the South Doodlakine property. As a result some 50 dogs were seized and taken to the RSPCA in Malaga.

The dogs, of various breeds and age, were roughly segregated according to breed in different areas of the property.

Many of the dogs were found to be suffering from ear mite and secondary infections resulting from failure to treat the conditions by taking the animals to a vet.

An underground bunker was also located on the property; the floor of the bunker was three metres below ground and could only be accessed through a small circular hole with a metal lid, about one metre in diameter.

When the lid was opened there was a stench of animal faeces and urine and 12 dogs were located in the bunker. While there was food and water, the dogs were confined to total darkness during the day with little or no ventilation.

http://www.getliving.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2575:cruelty-woman-back-in-court&catid=1:latest-news&Itemid=50
97
Puppy farm kept dogs in filthy, unventilated underground bunker in WA 

Updated 28 minutes ago

    Puppy farm closed height=227 Photo: A dog is lifted out of an underground bunker at a puppy farm in the Wheatbelt. (Supplied: RSPCA)   

 A puppy farm which kept dogs in an underground bunker in sordid conditions has been shut down and the owner ordered to pay more than $30,000.

The farm was operating just outside the Wheatbelt town of Kellerberrin, in South Doodlakine.

Katherine Lisa King, 43, was today found guilty of three counts of animal cruelty.

RSPCA inspectors, police and rangers searched King's property in 2012.

They found 50 dogs, 12 of which were being kept in a dank hole underground, which could only be accessed through a small hole covered by a metal lid.

The dogs were living in their own faeces and urine, in total darkness and with little or no ventilation, according to the RSPCA.

The breeds included German shepherds, West Highland terriers, King Charles cavalier spaniels, labradors and Tibetan terriers.

Many of the dogs were found to be suffering from ear mite and secondary infections.

King also had a miniature pony stallion and six or more chickens on the property.

The court prohibited Ms King from being in charge of or being within 10 metres of any animal.

Ms King was also found to be in breach of an earlier order which prohibited her from being in charge of, or having contact with any animal for a period of 10 years from August 2004 onwards.

The RSPCA urged buyers to find out where their new pet has come from.

The association referred buyers to their Smart Puppy and Dog Buyer’s Guide on how to best go about finding a new pet.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-05/puppy-farm-kept-dogs-in-underground-bunker-in-wa/5503564?WT.ac=statenews_wa
98
Indonesian media outlets are reporting that local police in North Jakarta 'opened fire' at a number of cows on a busy toll road, after the truck transporting the cattle overturned.

Sources from the live export industry have told ABC Rural the cattle involved were imported from Australia.

  Traffic congestion in Jakarta height=227 Photo: Traffic congestion in Jakarta (Flickr: VasenkaPhotography)   

The animals were being transported from Tanjung Priok port to Bekasi.

It's understood that a total of 13 animals escaped the crashed vehicle, of which six were shot by local police and another was killed by a passing truck.

According to the Jakarta Post, the traffic police shot at the cows to prevent them from disturbing the busy Cakung-Cilincing toll road.

"The cows were jeopardising the safety of motorists," said traffic patrol unit head Jazari.

"The officers were forced to shoot because these cows (were) running amok and very dangerous."

The truck transporting the cattle overturned after it was hit from behind by another truck. 

ABC Rural    Updated 4.6.2014

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-03/indonesian-police-shoot-cattle/5497672
99
Other (non-export) News / 'Ag-Gag' Laws Backed To Hide Animal Cruelty
« Last post by WA Export News on June 04, 2014, 10:36:49 AM »
 ANIMAL CRUELTY    3 Jun 2014

'Ag-Gag' Laws Backed To Hide Animal Cruelty By Ben Latham

                   
 A push for new legislation that will force animal rights activists to hand over footage to police rather than media is aimed at keeping the public in the dark, writes Ben Latham.

Out of sight and out of mind, the Australian meat industry benefits from keeping consumers in the dark about what happens behind the closed doors of factory farms and slaughterhouses.

It is unsurprising then that agricultural lobby groups, including Australian Pork Limited, are currently advocating the introduction of a new set of legislation, termed ‘ag-gag’ laws, that will essentially sensor investigations that expose animal welfare abuses in Australian agriculture. It is worrying, however, that several politicians are now adding the laws to their agenda on Capital Hill.

The laws are inspired by legislation already enacted in several states of the US that, under the guise of protecting the welfare of livestock, primarily seek to prohibit evidence of animal cruelty and malpractice being brought to the attention of the media and the general public.

In Australia, undercover footage of animal abuse in factory farms is the main modus operandi of activists, such as Animal Liberation, who have exposed the horrific conditions of 15 piggeries and led to the closure of two, including the controversial Wally’s Piggery that sparked public outrage in 2012.

 Wally's Piggery in Murrumbateman, NSW... the subject of a major scandal in 2012.Wally's Piggery in Murrumbateman, NSW... the subject of a major scandal in 2012.

But although these tactics are illegal, publishing the material is entirely aboveboard. UNSW law academic Tara Ward points to a case in 2011 where the High Court ruled that the ABC be permitted to broadcast undercover footage obtained from inside the slaughtering facility of a possum abattoir.

Meanwhile, Emma Davies of the Animal Defenders Office ACT explained that the footage, even if illegally obtained, can also be accepted as evidence in a criminal trial.

“Trespassing is an offence in itself, which means entering private property without permission to record activities may attract criminal and civil liability,” Davies said. “The use and/or installation of audio or visual surveillance devices may, however, amount to an offence in itself in some jurisdictions, such as NSW, even if it does not involve trespass.

“It is also important to note that courts may permit surveillance materials to be admitted as evidence in criminal proceedings, even if it was obtained by unlawful means.”

As such, a key feature of the ‘ag-gag’ laws being considered in Australia is the requirement that all footage of animal abuse in factory farms be turned over to police and relevant authorities within, at most, 48-hours. All evidence must be turned over, none of which can be given to the media or published by any other means.

Western Australia Senator Chris Back is an outspoken supporter of ‘ag-gag’ laws and argues that the provisions allow appropriate authorities to immediately investigate breaches of conduct, instead of footage being exploited to misinform the public and fuel inflammatory campaigns. In particular, he compares activists’ tactics to withholding evidence of child molestation.

“Any person with a keen interest in animal welfare, if they came upon information or vision that appeared to be of undue cruelty to animals, there should be no motivation for them to do anything other than present that material to authorities as quickly as possible, to have the issue addressed,” Back told The Australian Dairyfarmer last July.

“It would be unacceptable to the community that any person would withhold that footage for any length of time, for whatever the purpose, before they made it public.”

But opponents to ‘ag-gag’ laws see things differently. US journalist and author Will Potter specialises in animal rights and environmental movements, and presented a lecture series around Australia throughout May to raise awareness of the danger of ‘ag-gag’ laws, using the experience of the US as a dire warning.

“By eliminating that release to the media, it prevents the public and consumers from knowing what’s happening, which is the point of these ‘ag-gag’ laws,” Potter explained.

“But also turning over that footage so quickly is an attempt by the industry to say an incident is just an isolated case, rather than allowing an investigation to be built over a period of weeks or months. This way, they can pretend that it’s just a few bad apples, a few bad workers, rather than taking proper responsibility.”

Animal Liberation fights for the right of the Australian public to make up its own mind regarding the treatment and welfare of livestock.

“The public has a right to know what is happening to animals raised in factory farms. The industry knows as well as we do that if the general public become aware of their practices… they would be condemned by much of the Australian public,” Clare Atkinson of Animal Liberation ACT said.

“In regards to these matters being resolved by the police, much of the cruelty and abuse shown in footage is completely legal and considered standard industry practice. However when incidents occur that are illegal Animal Liberation ACT will refer footage on to the authorities, as was done in the case of Wally’s Piggery in 2012.”

The Australian public has a fundamental right to know how the food we consume ends up on our plate, a right that is being threatened by the proposed ‘ag-gag’ laws that purposefully keep consumers unaware, while strangling open and transparent debate and discussion.

While pressure from consumers and retailers can force much needed change within the industry, such as the phasing out of sow stalls, as long as footage is withheld, the public is kept clueless and it is ‘business as usual and as brutal’ for the meat industry, profits unharmed.


https://newmatilda.com/2014/06/03/ag-gag-laws-keep-consumers-blind-animal-cruelty

 
100
  THE live export debate has been reignited and calls made for the cancellation of an exporter's licence following the emergence of more footage showing Australian livestock being mistreated overseas.

  After releasing controversial video of Australian sheep being slaughtered in Jordan last month, Animals Australia has revealed breaches of live export regulations in Mauritius.

The animals welfare group's investigators filmed Australian bulls being roughly dragged on and off trucks by ropes, falling onto concrete, collapsing, and being tightly restrained and slaughtered in backyards during the Festival of Sacrifice.
         
       Australian cattle being mistreated in Mauritius height=237   Animals Australia has released shocking footage of cruelty to Australian animals in Mauritius. Source: AAP
   
As the Department of Agriculture investigates the matter, there have been calls for the exporter International Livestock Exports - which is under investigation for similar breaches in Kuwait in January - to be stripped of its licence.

Victorian MP Kelvin Thompson, who is in favour of replacing live exports with a chilled meat export industry, says the matter required a tough response from the federal government.

"The Department of Agriculture must either cancel or suspend the export licences of the exporter involved," Mr Thompson said.

"Only real penalties, not Mickey Mouse ones, will act as a deterrent against these practices.

"It has the power to take the export license off this exporter and it should use it."

RSPCA Australia also called for immediate action, saying the federal government's Exporter Supply Chain Assurance Scheme (ESCAS), brought in after the Indonesian abattoir scandal in 2011, had again failed.

"These breaches are making a mockery of the system and its regulator, the Department of Agriculture, which has yet to take action to penalise exporters who fail to comply," RSPCA Australia's chief scientist Bidda Jones said.

Dr Jones said it was shocking the federal government announced on Friday it would scrap the Australian Animal Welfare Advisory Committee, which advises Minister for Agriculture Barnaby Joyce and drives the implementation of the Australian Animal Welfare Strategy.

"What will happen to the strategy and, importantly, where does this leave the Australian government's commitment to improve the welfare of animals?"
  • 7 months ago November 08, 2013 3:02PM
http://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/australian-bulls-mistreated-in-mauritius/story-e6frfku9-1226755485409
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]